Entries by Jean Rhodes

Today’s special: Friendship, with a side of purpose and direction

Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction. John F. Kennedy by Jean Rhodes Although most youth interventions are developed in response to particular needs or goals, mentoring programs were conceived more broadly as an extension of informal helping relationships. For nearly a century, most volunteer mentors were tasked simply with building friendships […]

Methods Corner: What is an effect size?

by Adar Ben-Eliyahu, Ph.D. Most studies focus on “statistical significance,” or the probability that certain findings are reflected in the data. To test this, researchers actually propose a “null hypothesis,”  (e.g., mentoring has no effect on self-esteem). If the data show that the null hypothesis has less than a 5% chance of being right, we […]

Mentoring and the New Science of “Wise Interventions”

  In his influential paper, The New Science of Wise Intervention, Stanford psychologist Gregory Walton argued for the importance of first developing psychologically precise theories of change that target the processes (e.g., maladaptive thoughts, behaviors, feelings, environments) that impede thriving and then developing interventions that efficiently target and alter these processes. Changes in these processes […]

On Methods: What’s a meta-analysis, anyways?

ay 1, 2019/by Jean Rhodes by Adar Ben-Eliyahu, Ph.D. Senior Lecturer (Assistant Professor), University of Haifa There is often considerable fanfare when a new meta-analysis is published. What’s the excitement about anyways? Don’t most meta-analyses seem to be saying things we already know from previous research? This is somewhat true, as meta-analyses summarize previous research findings. […]

Relying on youth mentoring programs for mental health services: Challenges and implications

by Jean Rhodes In a recent issue of  Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology  psychologists Miguel Villodas and Alejandro Vázquez, published a study that has important implications for the future of youth mentoring programs. Their survey of nearly 750 caregivers to adolescents revealed that black caregivers were far less likely than white caregivers to perceive […]

From “out of the park” mentoring relationships to consistent, evidence-based approaches

by Jean Rhodes For years, I was stubbornly convinced that formal mentoring programs should focus mostly on creating and maintaining deep, emotional bonds. I saw attempts to scale back on relationship length and strength, or to rely on curricula, as existential threats to the field–destined to reduce already modest effects. But, evaluations and meta-analyses of […]

Learning from the Field of Work-Based Mentoring

by Jean Rhodes For decades, the fields of youth mentoring and work-based mentoring have operated on parallel tracks–covering the same terrain but somehow unaffected by of each other. With few exceptions (e.g., the excellent  Blackwell Handbook of Mentoring, which is edited by Professors Tammy Brown and Lillian Eby), disciplinary boundaries have gotten in the way of learning what […]

‘My guidance counselor didn’t do any of this’: How mentors can extend the vital work of school counselors

By Jean Rhodes “When I was in high school, my guidance counselor did not do any of this…I saw my guidance counselor when I was applying for college.” (Jacquelyn Indrisano, ninth grade guidance counselor at East Boston High, quoted in Boston Globe) A Boston Globe article recently described the changing roles of high school guidance […]

Mentoring without borders: Three ways to join the international youth mentoring movement

By Jean Rhodes Although the U.S. continues to account for the largest proportion of youth mentoring programs, many others have emerged across the globe, most notably in Israel, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and, more recently, continental Europe.  In fact the European Centre for Evidence-Based Mentoring and a growing network of mentoring programs […]