Entries by Jean Rhodes

Five strategies for making stronger connections, backed by research

by Jean Rhodes Care for some direct, research-based ideas for connecting with others?  I’d recommend a book that distills the essential findings of many studies.  Friend and Foe, by Business Professors Adam Galinsky and Maurice Schweitzer or Columbia and University of Pennsylvania, respectively. Compiled by Eric Barker, the authors provide evidence-based strategies for handling the everyday relationship tensions and difficulties. Some […]

What Poverty Does to the Young Brain

BY MADELINE OSTRANDER For a growing child, deprivation and stress can become a kind of neurotoxin. The brain’s foundation, frame, and walls are built in the womb. As an embryo grows into a fetus, some of its dividing cells turn into neurons, arranging themselves into layers and forming the first synapses, the organ’s electrical wiring. […]

Stuff about oppression

  acknowledge the role of ongoing racial oppression and the barriers to the pursuit of her dreams (CITE). Indeed, mentors are sometimes advised to avoid engaging in discussions about what might be considered difficult or taboo topics, such as money, politics and religion, or class, race, sexual orientation and culture.  Yet avoiding such topics may […]

The five most popular Chronicle posts of 2019

by Jean Rhodes Thanks for helping to make 2019 another banner year for Chronicle of Evidence-Based Mentoring! In case you missed them, here are five of the most frequently viewed posts of 2019. Many readers delved into the five key takeaways of a comprehensive new meta-analysis on youth mentoring. Readers also considered the two logical […]

The mentoring paradox, and how to solve it

by Jean Rhodes In a forthcoming book, “Older and wiser: Rethinking youth mentoring for the 21st Century,” (Harvard University Press), I explore why the field of mentoring has remained somewhat decoupled from the more rigorous guidelines of prevention science, and has been granted considerable immunity from the consequences of disappointing findings over the years. Although […]

Trauma informed mentoring: Early trauma exposure raises risk for young women ADHD/self-injury

by Yasmin Anwar   Exposure to abuse, neglect, or other traumas in childhood and adolescence puts young women with ADHD at a heightened risk of self-injury, a new study shows. The findings indicate that environmental factors can have a significant bearing on the negative psychosocial outcomes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder—and also raise the question whether […]

Today’s special: Friendship, with a side of purpose and direction

Efforts and courage are not enough without purpose and direction. John F. Kennedy by Jean Rhodes Although most youth interventions are developed in response to particular needs or goals, mentoring programs were conceived more broadly as an extension of informal helping relationships. For nearly a century, most volunteer mentors were tasked simply with building friendships […]

Methods Corner: What is an effect size?

by Adar Ben-Eliyahu, Ph.D. Most studies focus on “statistical significance,” or the probability that certain findings are reflected in the data. To test this, researchers actually propose a “null hypothesis,”  (e.g., mentoring has no effect on self-esteem). If the data show that the null hypothesis has less than a 5% chance of being right, we […]