Podcasts

Cindy Crawford, talks about the advice and influence of her parents, teachers and early modeling coworkers

  Chapter 46 of Matilda Raffa Cuomo’s book: The Person Who Changed My Life, American supermodel, international celebrity, actress and spokesperson, Cindy Crawford, talks about the advice and influence of her parents, teachers and early modeling coworkers.  

The late Sir David Frost recalls his high school English teacher

Chapter 77 of Matilda Raffa Cuomo’s book: The Person Who Changed My Life, journalist, comedian, writer, media personality and television host David Frost recalls his high school English teacher who encouraged him to think critically and for himself.  

Edward Asner remembers the enduring influence of his high school football coach and his journalism teacher

In Chapter 7 of Matilda Raffa Cuomo’s book: The Person Who Changed My Life,Edward Asner, film, television, and stage actor and former president of the Screen Actors Guild, remembers the enduring influence of his high school football coach and his journalism teacher.              

The late Walter Cronkite’s reflection on his high school mentor, Fred Birney

In Matilda Raffa Cuomo’s book, The Person Who Changed My Life, acclaimed broadcast journalist and anchorman Walter Cronkite discussed his high school mentor — a man who was instrumental in setting him on his lifelong career path of journalism. Here is an excerpt by Walter Cronkite: I went to San Jacinto High School in Houston, Texas, in […]

Tactful mentors: A mentor is often someone older, but must she also be wiser?  

When I train mentors, especially those with considerable life and work experience, or when I discuss training with mentoring professionals who provide training to such mentors in their programs, I try to make clear my belief that mentors need to know that a youth mentor’s job is not to “talk at” or “inform” the mentee […]

Laughter: A neglected but vital element of mentoring

There is little success where there is little laughter. ~Andrew Carnegie by Jean Rhodes A silly comment made 25 years ago led to my marriage. We were both new professors, taking part in a campus tour of the arts complex when a particularly inquisitive member of our group asked one too many questions about a room’s acoustics. […]

Should “mentor duty” be the new “jury duty?”

By Brandon Busteed Gallup just conducted a large study of young Americans aged 18 to 35 and found that those who had high exposure to certain 21st century skill development in school were twice as likely to be successful at work. The two most critical ingredients were whether they had “worked on a long-term projects […]

Laughter can encourage self-disclosure and closeness with mentees

by Jeremy Dean Laughter encourages people to open up and this is the secret to how to make friends, a new study finds. People in the study were more likely to disclose something personal about themselves after laughing together, although they didn’t realise it. Self-disclosure is usually critical to how to make friends, as the study’s […]

Facebook adds lifelines to prevent teen suicide

Posted by Deborah Bach-UW on March 2, 2015. In addition to vacation photos and cat videos, people also share details about their personal lives and feelings on Facebook—including occasional posts about despair and even thoughts of suicide. As the world’s biggest social network, with more than 1.39 billion users, Facebook is uniquely able to provide online […]

You should sometimes talk politics and religion: Here’s why

by Jean Rhodes I was presenting findings from my research on Hurricane Katrina to a group of college students when something very interesting happened. Many of the students were first generation Haitian immigrants, others the privileged sons and daughters of Boston’s elite. Still other were first generation college students from Southie and Dorchester, mixed income neighborhoods near […]