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Study shows most teenage friendships doomed to fail: But whose fault is that?

By Sam Carr, Lecturer in Education, University of Bath The psychiatrist Harry Sullivan believed that nothing is a more significant determinant of psychological well-being than the nature of our closest social bonds. In adolescence, research has consistently linked the quality of friendships to important outcomes such as emotional health, self esteem, the ability to overcome social […]

The Seeds of Extreme Self-Criticism Can Have Deadly Results: Implications for Mentors

Written by Michael O. Schroeder, U.S. News From a very early age, we learn – in a manner of speaking – to nitpick ourselves. We take information from those we encounter and the world around us to fine-tune how we act and who we are, taking note of what doesn’t work in an ongoing internal dialogue that stretches […]

Teens with lots of friends stay healthy longer

Posted by Thania Benios-UNC o The more social ties people have at an early age, the better their health is at the beginnings and ends of their lives, a new study suggests. Researchers say the study is the first to definitively link social relationships with concrete measures of physical well-being such as abdominal obesity, inflammation, […]

How support helps buffer the harmful effects of stress on children

Submitted by Amy Glaspie on Thu, 11/05/2015 – 09:32 (from SRA) Camelia E. Hostinar, Ph.D. (Northwestern University and University of California, Davis) Research is me-search, psychologists often say, referring to the fact that their research ideas are often inspired by personal experiences or shaped by their own worldview and existential questions. For me, the life […]